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Sunday, March 30, 2014

Jennifer Gabriel Powell


It is with great sadness and very heavy hearts that Anne Poole and Roberta Estes, directors of the Lost Colony Research Group, convey the heartbreaking message that we have lost our own Jennifer Gabriel Powell.  Jenn is the archaeologist for the Lost Colony Research Group, but she was so much more.  Jenn met Andy Powell, now Andy Gabriel Powell, retired mayor of Bideford, England, on our dig in 2012.  Three months later, she went to England to visit Andy, and suffice it to say she never came back, except to get her visa and her cat.  She and Andy married on January 19, 2013. 

Jenn was just 34, completed her BS in archaeology in 2012, was lovely, brilliant and joyful.  She had her whole life in front of her.  We all loved Jenn and remember her laughing in her signature tie dye t-shirts that she made herself.  Jenn and Andy are both members of our Lost Colony family.

Yesterday, Jenn suffered a brain hemorrhage and today, after her mother arrived from the US, life support was discontinued and Jenn slipped away.  Our hearts grieve for two of our own, Jenn’s passing and Andy’s terrible loss.  Please light a candle and say a prayer for Jenn, Andy, Jenn’s parents and family.  We will have a memorial article for Jenn in the upcoming Lost Colony Research Group newsletter.



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Monday, February 17, 2014

Jamestown Mysteries Solved By Archeological Finds



Published on Jan 28, 2014 The Jamestown Rediscovery archaeologists over the years have come across several instances of disarticulated human skeletal remains in trash pits. This short film documents one such find. A skull fragment found in the fort's west bulwark ditch demonstrated clear evidence of an attempt at trephination (a surgical procedure performed in response to head injuries, whereby surgeons remove a plug of bone form the skull to prevent a buildup of fluid that could cause pressure on the brain). The research that is presented in this film was the result of a collaboration between the Smithsonian Institution and the Jamestown Rediscovery Project. Senior Staff Archaeologist, Jamie May of the Rediscovery Project narrates the film. This blog is © History Chasers
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Thursday, February 13, 2014

Today's Nature Publication Refutes Possibility of a Solutrean Migration to the Americas


A very exciting and definite paper has just been published by Naturetoday, titled “The genome of a Late Pleistocene human from a Clovis burial site in western Montana,” by Rasmussen et al. The authors conclude that the DNA of a Clovis child is ancestral to Native Americans.  Said another way, this Clovis child was a descendant, along with Native people today, of the original migrants from Asia who crossed the Bering Strait.

All four types of DNA were tested; Y chromosome, mtDNA, autosomal and X. Everything tested as having come through the Bering Strait from Asia. There was no European admixture.  

This information is very important to a number of academic disciplines. I am sure much more remains to be explored and explained, but we can rest assured in this fact: 


"The researchers concluded that the Clovis infant belonged to a meta-population from which many contemporary Native Americans are descended and is closely related to all indigenous American populations.  In essence, contemporary Native Americans are “effectively direct descendants of the people who made and used Clovis tools and buried this child,” covering it with red ochre.
Furthermore, the data refutes the possibility that Clovis originated via a European, Solutrean, migration to the Americas."


http://dna-explained.com/2014/02/13/clovis-people-are-native-americans-and-from-asia-not-europe/

www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/39153/title/First-Ancient-North-American-Genome-Sequenced/


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Sunday, December 22, 2013

Please sign this petition to preserve Hatteras Lighthouse Keeper Stones

Letter by Dawn Taylor

We the descendants of those who manned the Historic Cape Hatteras Light Station located on North Carolina's Outer Banks and citizens of the United States,are petitioning NC Congressman Walter Jones and the National Park Service to preserve and protect the original granite foundation stones which bear the names and dates of our forefathers who honorably gave of themselves to provide those at sea a beacon in which to safely navigate the dangerous waters known as the Graveyard of the Atlantic.

In 1999, the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse was moved back 1,600 feet to protect it from the encroaching Atlantic Ocean.After the move the Outer Banks Lighthouse Society spent almost $12,000 to have the original granite stones which had been cut away from the lighthouse foundation, engraved with the names and dates of all of the keepers of the Hatteras light. The stones were then arranged in a circle to mark the original location of the historic lighthouse.

Over the years, due to coastal storms,this historic site which mean so much to the keeper descendants and lighthouse enthusiast alike,has been covered with sand and the stones scattered around by waves. Just as the lighthouse was moved for preservation's sake, we want these stones to also be maintained and protected from the sea.They represent such a large part of our island's heritage and history.

In May of 2013, in a letter to the Outer Banks Lighthouse Society, seashore superintendent Barclay Trimble said, “Because of coastal processes, namely shoreline erosion and dune migration, the stones have routinely become covered with sand requiring substantial effort to keep them uncovered.”

The National Park Service has also responded by stating that it no longer intends to keep maintaining the stones due to it being no longer practical to keep uncovering and rearranging the stones after each storm. To most, this is an unacceptable answer.

Each year,especially through peak tourist season, thousands visit the lighthouse per day and purchase Climbing Tour Tickets at $8 for adults and $4 for senior citizens. It is not hard to do the math and to see that indeed, there are funds out there to preserve the site we are petitioning.

These original Cape Hatteras Lighthouse Foundation Stones located at the original lighthouse site,with the names of our forefather's etched in their remembrance, should be preserved. We the lighthouse descendants and all who cherish and honor it's existence are hereby joining together by the creation of this petition to make our voices heard and to see  that these cherished stones will still be there for future generations to visit, just as we have.

Signed...

Dawn Farrow Taylor
President - Cape Hatteras Genealogical and Preservation Society

https://www.change.org/petitions/nc-congressman-walter-jones-and-the-national-park-service-cape-hatteras-to-maintain-preserve-and-protect-the-original-foundation-keeper-stones-located-at-the-site-of-the-cape-hatteras-lighthouse



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Sunday, November 24, 2013

Which First Thanksgiving?



No. 1. In 1586, the first thanksgiving held by Englishmen on the North American continent took place on Roanoke Island, North Carolina. This celebration was by the company of 100 men from Cornwall, England that Sir Walter Raleigh had brought to America to found a colony. After a year when the relief ship arrived, they held a thanksgiving dinner, and fed-up with the hardships and perils, they all went home.

No. 2. In 1609, at Jamestown, Virginia, the starving remnants of the first settlers held a thanksgiving dinner while awaiting the arrival of their relief ship.

No. 3. In 1612, also at Jamestown, Virginia, a dinner was held after the arrival of Governor Dale with a ship-load of girls intended to become the wives of the settlers.

No. 4. In 1619, a dinner of thanks was held at Berkley Plantation on the James River in Virginia.

No. 5. In 1621, at Plymouth Plantation, a great dinner of thanks was held. Pilgrim Edward Winslow in a letter of December 11, 1621, to a friend in England, described their First Thanksgiving (as printed in Mourt's Relation) as follows.

"Our harvest being gotten in our Governor sent four men on fowling, so we might after a more special manner rejoice together, after we had gathered the fruit of our labors. They, four, in one day killed as much fowl as with a little beside, served the company almost a week. At which time amongst other recreations, we exercised our arms, many of the Indians coming amongst us, and amongst the rest their greatest King Massasoit with some 90 men, whom for three days we entertained and feasted. And they went out and killed five deer which they brought to the Plantation, and bestowed on our Governor, and upon the Captain and others."
This latter Thanksgiving dinner is the one that has survived and became the National Holiday.




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Saturday, September 21, 2013

Get a Family Tree DNA Coupon for $10. off any Test Costing $40. or More with a GEDCOM Upload

The coupon can be used toward any test costing $40. or more.

A Family Tree DNA Coupon Promotes GEDCOM Upload

A new Family Tree DNA coupon offer is promoting pedigree file (GEDCOM) uploads. This is a good way to improve your match comparisons. 
Here is what you do:
- See more at: 

http://www.haplogroup.org/family-tree-dna-coupon-gedcom/#sthash.QB8fT3Sv.dpbs

Saturday, September 14, 2013

Congratulations, Cyndi!!!!




15 Years of Cyndi's List

September 13, 2013
by Alan SmithSpokane Genealogy Examiner


Has it really been that long? I can recall in 1999 my attention being drawn to a website known as Cyndi’s List from a newspaper article. By that time Cyndi’s List had been on line for four years. Over the years, several other articles in the paper toted this wondrous site. It was the absolute best place to start your research because it was such a jump off site for countless other places on the web concerning genealogy.http://www.cyndislist.com/us/
What I did not know then, and just discovered was Cyndi’s List was home grown. On September 12, 1995, a single paged website with 1,025 links was presented to the Tacoma-Pierce County Genealogical Society meeting. That fall it was expanded to six pages and Cyndi’s list was born.

Cont. Here:

http://www.examiner.com/article/15-years-of-cyndi-s-list?cid=rss

http://www.cyndislist.com/us/

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Friday, July 12, 2013

Buy Kathy Mattea ticket and get Lost Colony ticket for FREE!

Through July 15th at midnight, when you buy a ticket to see Kathy Mattea on July 21, you'll receive a voucher for a FREE ticket to see The Lost Colony good for any night in the 2013 season! Keep it for yourself, give it as a gift....whatever floats your boat. No promo codes, no secret passwords, no fees, no gimmicks....no kidding. It's that simple. We'll have your vouchers waiting for you when you pick your tickets up for the the Kathy Mattea concert. It's like saving $24 on your concert ticket!

Tickets are on sale now by calling 252-473-6000 or online at www.thelostcolony.org. The Lost Colony is proud to present this iconic singer/songwriter in the second concert in the PNC Presents: Live At The Waterside Concert Series. A crowd of nearly 1000 gathered on July 7th for the inaugural event of the series when Ralph Stanley made his first Outer Banks appearance in his 60 plus year career. Kathy Mattea is presented by The Lost Colony and PNC Bank and sponsored by Ace Hardware of the Outer Banks and Dixie 105.7.



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Tuesday, June 25, 2013

Della Basnight returns to ‘The Lost Colony’ as Dame Coleman.

Della Basnight (right) returns to 'The Lost Colony' as Dame Coleman. (photo: OBXentertainment.com)

Della Basnight (right) returns to ‘The Lost Colony’ as Dame Coleman. (photo: OBXentertainment.com)

“I first auditioned for The Lost Colony when I was six or seven, and I had to go alone because Mama could not go with me”, said Della Basnight as she talked about her return to the stage of the Waterside Theatre in this season’s production of Paul Green’s The Lost Colony
She entered the old Courthouse, where the auditions were held, with great confidence and was determined to be a part of the show.  When asked by the director if she could behave backstage, she replied, “I’ll be real good.”  Her response generated a big laugh from the crowd.  That was it…her first laugh…her first vote of confidence.  She liked it and wanted to make people laugh; she knew the stage was for her. 


Cont. here:
http://obxentertainment.com/2013/06/22/della-basnight-returns-to-the-lost-colony-as-dame-coleman/

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